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The Early Ewing Families of Augusta County, Virginia:
Parts II to IV

William W. Sproul, III (+1 304.645.5332, Sproul3 at frontier dot com)

In the early Western Virginia settlement period of the mid-1700s, most of the area from the Blue Ridge to the Mississippi was Augusta County, Virginia. There were at least three early James Ewing settlers in Augusta County plus a Joshua Ewing settler, all with large families using similar names and living in close proximity within this area:

  James Ewing of Monroe County (c1722 – <1800)
    lower Greenbrier River area — Indian and Turkey Creeks
  James Ewing of Pocahontas County (1720 – 1801)
    upper Greenbrier River — Ewing/Knapp Creek
  Joshua Ewing of Pocahontas County (1734 – 1810)
    upper Greenbrier River — Locust Bottom
  Captain James Ewing (c1721 – 1796)
    Staunton and Middlebrook areas

Early records of the James Ewings in this area are quite ambiguous as to just which James is being referenced. Lyman Chalkley's Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish Settlement in Virginia,[1] the definitive compilation of Augusta County records to 1800, contains some ninety-six items referencing Ewings. Of these, about seventy-eight can be reasonably well associated with one of six different Ewing families, the remaining eighteen still being ambiguous. These six Ewing families in Chalkley's accounting are the four above plus a Henry Ewing family in Rockingham County and Charles and Robert Ewing families in Bedford County.

In addition to the confusion caused by there being numerous Ewing families, the Virginia counties and their boundaries were continually changing. In 1745 Augusta County encompassed almost all the land west of the Blue Ridge, down to the North Carolina / Tennessee line and west to the Mississippi River. The land that James Ewing of Monroe settled was first in Augusta County, then in Botetourt County, and then in Greenbrier County before becoming part of Monroe County. The early records are dispersed among these counties and other colonial and United States jurisdictions. Pocahontas James' records can be found in Augusta, Botetourt, Greenbrier, Bath and Randolph Counties before Pocahontas County. Further, the continuing movement of these settlers among areas amplifies the difficulty of tracing their records.

While two of these Augusta County settlers – James and Joshua – are associated with Pocahontas County, that county did not exist until 1821, long after both were gone. Their records are mostly found in Botetourt and Greenbrier counties with some found in Bath County. With the partitioning of the Augusta County area into many new counties and their boundaries changing, records are found in dispersed places. The changing of counties and Ewing family movement is depicted in the sketch below indicating where their records might be found.

I have analyzed these four Ewing families whose overlapping records in the 1700s and early 1800s in the Augusta County area cause so much confusion. I have found various source documents and uncovered various references worthy of further investigation.

I have provided only overviews of the Pocahontas James and Joshua Ewing families; these families are well-known and have been well-documented. My focus has been on the Monroe County James Ewing family and the Staunton-area Capt. James Ewing family. These have not been, until now, all that well-researched and documented.

My conclusions with respect to the Monroe County James Ewing were presented in an earlier Journal article.[2] My conclusions with respect to the others are presented in this article. The 'full story' – presenting all I have found with respect to these four Ewings – is available on the Ewing Family Association's web site, accompanied by various detailed material.[3]

Part II – James Ewing Family of Pocahontas County, West Virginia

James Ewing, born in 1721 and an early settler of Pocahontas County, was the fifth child of John Ewing of Carnashannagh, Ireland, and his second wife Janett McElvaney. His brother John had a son, Joshua, who also settled nearby on land originally assigned to his uncle James. The background of the John of Carnashannagh family is well documented in Evelyn (Jones)  Ewing's Ewings of Shenandoah Valley Virginia,[4],[5] and more detail of this family is presented in Margaret Ewing Fife's Ewing in Early America.[6]

James Ewing was an early pioneer in the Jackson River and Greenbrier River areas of what is now western Virginia and West Virginia. His earliest recorded date is for a land survey, 254 acres on the Jackson River at Muddy Run in 1746, so he must have been there by then, but probably not long before as that area was just being surveyed and opened following a 30,000-acre grant to Andrew and Thomas Lewis in 1743. James later moved about nineteen miles further west to settle and establish the name of Ewing Creek (now known as Knapps Creek). He is noted in a 1751 survey there with a call "over the top of Ewing's house." This is in the area near today's town of Marlinton in Pocahontas County, West Virginia.

In 1770, James turned over his claim to Moses Moore for a steel trap and ₤2. This is the last known transaction involving James Ewing. His inventory was filed in 1801 in Bath County so he lived to eighty years of age. His inventory included only a horse, gun, saddle, and some clothes and blankets. His children were by then grown and long off on their own.

James had ten children, born from 1741 to 1772. These children and their children are listed in the following table, which should be helpful in identifying persons associated with various records. Included are a few more James Ewings to compound our confusion. Note that there are also brothers John and William. These brothers appear to have had local contact with similarly named John and William Ewing brothers both of the Frederick County and Monroe County Ewing families.

One daughter, Ann, married Archibald Clendenin who was killed in a 1763 raid by Indians of Chief Cornstalk's Shawnee tribe. Ann, two of her children, and her brother John were taken captive. Ann escaped, but one of her children was killed as the Indians attempted to lure her back. John and his niece Jane were taken to an area in Ohio where they remained with the Indians for nearly two years before being allowed to return. John was known as 'Indian John' thereafter. Most of the family moved to Gallia County, Ohio, in 1810.

A great deal has been written about this family in Nancy Hanks Ewing's James Ewing – Pioneer.[7] Wally Ewing presents some additional interesting family history in his The Ewings: One American Family.[8] There is a continuing debate as to whether or not this James Ewing married a second wife, Sarah Edwards, and raised another five children, as shown in the following table.

Descendants of James Ewing of Pocahontas County, West Virginia  [9] 

  born died married
James (Pocahontas James) 1720, America 1801, Virginia  
Sarah Mays, first wife      
  Ann Janett 1741 1817, Greenbrier County  
      (first) Archibald Clendenin
    John Clendenin   1763, Pocahontas County  
    Jane Clendenin 1757, Augusta County 1834, Christian County, Kentucky
    James Clendenin 1760 1763, Pocahontas County  
        (second) John Rogers
    Nancy Ann Rogers 1768, Greenbrier County 1768, Greenbrier County  
    Archibald Rogers 1770    
    James Rogers 1773    
  Susan Jane 1743, Greenbrier County   Moses Moore
    Aaron Moore 1792, Pocahontas County 1839, Pocahontas County  
  John (Indian John) 1747, Virginia 1824, Gallia County, Ohio Ann Smith
    William 1774, Augusta County 1858, Pocahontas County  
    Susanna 1776, Pocahontas County 1855, Van Buren County, Iowa  
        Stephen Holcomb
    John Smith 1778, Pocahontas County 1837  
    Jane Jennet 1780, Pocahontas County 1855, Jackson County  
    Sarah (Sallie) 1783, Augusta County 1850, Gallia County, Ohio  
    Nancy Ann 1785, Augusta County 1858, Ohio  
    Andrew 1787, Augusta County 1868, Gallia County, Ohio  
    Elizabeth 1788, Augusta County 1853-60, Gallia County, Ohio  
    Lydia 1792, Bath County 1872, Harrison County, Missouri
    Samuel 1795, Bath County 1855, Van Buren County, Iowa
  Elizabeth 1750 George Daugherty
  William (Swago Bill) 1756, Bath County 1822, Gallia County, Ohio  
        Mary McNeill, 1785
    Elizabeth 1787, Pocahontas County 1852, Gallia County, Ohio  
    Thomas 1788, Pocahontas County 1874, Gallia County, Ohio  
    Jonathan 1790, Pocahontas County 1850, Gallia County, Ohio  
    William 1792, Pocahontas County 1847, Gallia County, Ohio  
    James 1793, Pocahontas County 1824, Gallia County, Ohio  
    John 1795, Pocahontas County 1827, Jackson County, Illinois
    Sarah Jane 1797, Pocahontas County 1827  
    Enoch 1799, Pocahontas County 1885, Hillsdale County, Michigan
    Jacob 1802, Pocahontas County 1878, Hancock County, Illinois
    Abram McNeel 1804, Bath County 1891, Gallia County, Ohio  
    George A. 1807, Bath County 1883, Gallia County, Ohio  
    Andrew 1809, Pocahontas County 1885, Wayne County, Iowa  
Sarah Edwards, second wife   1818  
  James Jr. 1758, Botetourt County 1810 (first) Unknown
    John S. 1785, Tennessee 1847, Logan County, Illinois
    James 1787    
    Edy Margaret 1798, Virginia before 1870, White County, Illinois
    Ruthy 1787    
       

(second) Ladovesey/Ladusa Dillard

    Ruben B. 1801, Tennessee 1875  
    William P. 1802, Kentucky 1864, Clark County, Arkansas  
    Alfred 1805, Tennessee after 1880  
    Melinda 1806, Smith County, Tennessee  
    Sarah 1808  
    Nancy 1809  
  Edward 1762 1780, South Carolina

(never married)

  Mary 1763  

William Sexton

  Sarah (Sallie) 1765    
  Robert J. 1772

Elizabeth Booker

    Robert W. 1808, Kentucky 1877, Neosho County, Kansas

Part III – Joshua Ewing of Locust Creek at Greenbrier River

Joshua Ewing is the grandson of John Ewing of Carnashannagh, Ireland, and son of John Ewing. Thus, Joshua is a nephew of James Ewing of Pocahontas County – Pocahontas James – and came to live near the Greenbrier River on land originally assigned to his uncle James. The background of the John of Carnashannagh family is well documented in Evelyn (Jones) Ewing's Ewings of Shenandoah Valley Virginia [10] and a great deal of detail regarding this Joshua Ewing family is presented in Fife's Ewing in Early America.[11]

Around 1729, John Ewing of Carnashannagh, at age eighty-one, came to America with his large family and settled in Chester County, Pennsylvania. Several of his children, including William Ewing, ancestor of the Stephens-City Ewings, moved onward by the Great Philadelphia Wagon Road to the better land opportunities of the Shenandoah Valley. After John Ewing, father of Joshua, was killed by a male servant in 1736 in Chester County, his brother William Ewing and brother-in-law David Jenkins were named guardians and trustees of Joshua and his brother Thomas until they were twenty-one.

Grandparents of Joshua Ewing    
  John Ewing of Carnashannagh 1648 – 1745  
  m. (second), Janet McElvaney, 1701    
Parents of Joshua Ewing    
  John Ewing 1703 – 1736  
  m. Sarah Jenkins    
    Thomas Ewing circa 1732 – ?? deaf mute
    Joshua Ewing 1733 – 1810  
Joshua Ewing Family [12]    
  Joshua Ewing 1733 – 1810 buried at Little Levels
  m. Eleanor, 1759    
    Rebecca   m. John Collins
    Elonor   m. Abraham Hawks, 1802 [13]
    Mary   m. Samuel Curry Jr.
    Hannah   m. _?_ Collins
    Arron   m. Elineor Bartley
    John    
    Elijah    
    Joshua    
    Moses   m. Peggy Brown
    Sarah   m. Alexander Stevenson, 1778  [9]
    Agnes   m. John Stevenson

The earliest record we find for Joshua Ewing in the Augusta county area is in the 1763 estate sale of Naphtalim Gregory, one of the earliest settlers of what is now Pocahontas County. The first land record of Joshua is an 1774 survey of 270 acres on the north side of the Greenbrier River, at Little Levels near Locust Creek. In 1775, Joshua is noted in the list of tithables of the Little Levels area of Botetourt County along with William and John Ewing. These may have been sons of Pocahontas James since Joshua was located on Locust Creek, about twelve miles below Slago Creek where William and John Ewing held land. But other cousins, William and John Ewing, sons of William of Stephens City, were also in the area. At this point there were actually three sets of Ewing brothers in this area named William and John: the sons of Pocahontas James, Frederick William, and Monroe James. Joshua appears to have been reasonably prosperous. The Greenbrier Historical Society Journal notes that Joshua held 500 acres of land in 1783. and the Greenbrier County Tax List of that year shows him as having nine horses and seventeen cows.

Joshua Ewing was buried in the Ewing Cemetery, an acre of land which he gave as a public burying ground, located about Ό mile from the Greenbrier River about a mile above the mouth of Locust Creek in an area that became the Rhea place. Said to be buried there are Catherine Rhea, W. E. Ewing, Robert Rhea, and J. E. Ewing (Joshua).[14]

Year

Records Related to Joshua Ewing of Locust Creek

1763

Augusta County WB 3, p.292 – 26th September, 1763. Naphtalim Gregory's appraisement and settlement of estate recorded. – Debts due the estate by James Rusk, Jno. Rusk and Jno. Martin's estate. Account of sales on 13th September, 1763: To Jas. Williams, Michael Weaver. Wm. Fitzjarrell, Thos. Kirkpatrick, Richd. Morrison, Jno. Jordan, Joshua Ewing. Articles kept in hands of widow Mary. – Some hooks. Paid Jno. Humphries.

1763

Samuel Curry Jr. was born circa 1760. He married Mary (Ewing) Curry. Mary was born circa 1763 in Botetourt County, Virginia. Mary was the daughter of Joshua Ewing and Eleanor Ewing. Samuel's will was probated 14 May 1823 in Gallia County, Ohio.

1774

Survey of 270 acres for Joshua Ewing on the North side of the Greenbrier River.[15]

1775

Tithables: March and April 1775, Little Levels: Joshua Ewing, William Ewing, John Ewing.[16]

177x

177x, Joshua Ewing, 250 acres, Little Levels, assignee of Samuel Ewing.[17],[18]

1780

Joshua Ewing, 250 acres, Little Levels, adjacent to Wm Idings, by settlement, assignee James Ewing [19]

1783

1782/3 Greenbrier County Virginia Tax List [20]

Ewing              tithes       horses      cows          year  

Joshua               1               9            17          1783

1783

Land Owned in Greenbrier at the end of the Revolutionary War [21]

      1783           Joshua Ewing         500 acres

1784

Joshua Ewing, assignee of James Clerk, enters 100 acres adjacent land of the said Ewing at a place called Locust Bottom.[22]

1783, 1792, 1797

Land Grants in West Virginia [23]

Ewing, Joshua                250 acres       Little Levels        1783          Greenbrier County

Ewing, Joshua                250 acres       Locust Creek      1792          Greenbrier County

Ewing, Joshua                150 acres       Little Levels        1797          Bath County

1811

Ewing Cemetery: Located on the Rhea place, about Ό mile from the Greenbrier River just east and close to Denmar Correctional Facility. There is a small abandoned church right across the road from it. The land was originally willed as one acre of public burying ground by Joshua Ewing who was on the land when it was still not open for settlement. He patented the land, and it passed through at least a couple hands, one of which was the Rhea's. This is the only information currently available: Catherine Rhea, W. E. Ewing, Robert Rhea, J. E. Ewing (Joshua).[24]

1811

Will of Joshua Ewing [25] mentions:
      wife - Elonor
      daughter – Rebecca
      daughters – Elonor Hawks, Mary Curry
      daughter – Hannah Collins
      son – Arron
      sons – John, Elijah, Joshua, and Moses
      daughters – Sara and Agnes Stevenson

1811

Inventory of Joshua Ewing [26]

Part IV – Capt. James Ewing Family of Staunton, Virginia

The origins of this James Ewing have not been established and there are probably no surviving lines. However, from the DAR records of the Glebe Burying Grounds gravestones [27] and the will of Capt. James,[28] the names and birth/death dates of this family are known.

  born died notes age
Parents of Martha (Wilson) Ewing  
  Col. John Wilson 1701 1773 27 Years a Representative in the House of Burgesses 72
  Martha Wilson 1695 10 Jul 1755 wife of Col John Wilson 60
Capt. James and Martha Ewing Family  
  James Ewing   16 Feb 1796    
  m. (1 Nov 1761) Martha Wilson 15 Feb 1741 12 Jul 1828   87
    Jane Ewing 4 Mar 1762 26 Sep 1794    
    Martha Ewin 14 Mar 1764 21 July 1855 never married 91
    Sarah Ewing 8 Sep 1766 7 Mar 1793   17
    John Ewing 13 De 1768 3 Jun 1794   26
    William Ewing 9 May 1771 17 Jun 1794   23
    James Ewing, Jr. 18 Apr 1775 6 Jun 1799   24
    Joseph Ewing 12 Oct 1775 22 Sep 1835 m. Marlyn _?_  [29] 60
    Nancy Ewing 24 July 1780 22 Jun 1798 18

All members of the Capt. James Ewing family are buried in the Glebe Burying Grounds with the site and stones well-preserved today, although located in a somewhat remote woods near Middlebrook, Virginia. It is sad to note that almost all of this family died in the 1790s, two passing within days of each other in 1794 and seven altogether over a short five-year period. By 1800, the survivors consisted only of Martha, wife of Capt. James, a daughter Martha, and a son Joseph.

Martha never married. She used the name Ewin, both in her will and on her gravestone. Joseph is believed to have been married, but no survivors have been found. With the passing of Joseph at the age of sixty and Martha at ninety-one, this Ewing line seems to come to an end. However, Martha Ewing/Ewin did mention one unknown Ewing in her 1855 will – "to the heirs of Rob Ewin" – so perhaps there was some survivor of this line.

This James Ewing family mostly used the same given names as found in both the nearby and often confused Monroe and Pocahontas James Ewing families. Capt. James' signature appears on documents with the Monroe James, and his daughter Martha's will mentions many of the Monroe James family descendants who lived nearby. Still, there is no established family relationship.

The closest indication of a relationship found would be that these Ewings lived in close proximity to Susanna (Ewing) Sproul, daughter of James Ewing of Monroe County. The land that Capt. James purchased in 1772 appears to be adjacent to the farm of William and Susanna (Ewing) Sproul – Martha lived in nearby Middlebrook, and James Jr. owned lot #8 in Middlebrook. Archibald Alexander Sproul and his brother William Scott Sproul, grandchildren of Susanna, bought ninety-four acres of Martha's land also adjacent the Sproul farm in 1855 after she died. Of great significance is that Martha Ewing/Ewin a wealthy woman and in her 1855 will left the predominance of her wealth to various members of the Sproul family. This may indicate a familial relationship with the Monroe Ewing family or, perhaps also, that there were just no remaining survivors of the Capt. James line.

In James Ewing – Pioneer,[30] Nancy Hanks Ewing gives a brief sketch of this family:

Capt. James Ewing, merchant of Staunton, was married to Martha Wilson, daughter of Colonel John and Martha Wilson, also of Staunton. The colonel was for 27 years a representative in the Virginia House of Burgesses in Williamsburg. Both he and his wife, Martha who died in 1755 are buried in the Glebe Burying Grounds, as are Capt. James Ewing and his wife Martha and most of their children, several of whom died young.

Capt. James' will is dated February 3, 1795, and was proven October 18, 1796. His wife Martha is mentioned, as are two sons – James and Joseph – two daughters – Martha and Nancy – and several slaves.

This matches the information from the family gravestones at the Glebe Burying Grounds. There are ten Ewings buried at the Glebe Burying Ground, all apparently of the immediate family of Capt. James and Martha Ewing. All ten are either mentioned in Capt. James Ewing's 1796 will of or were already dead at the time of his death. There were four family members already buried here at the time of James' death.

Glebe Burying Grounds Records

Records of the Glebe Burying Grounds and its Capt. James Ewing family gravestones come from two sources:

  born died notes
Col. John Wilson   1773 ... in the 72nd year of his age, having served his country 27 years a representative in The Honorable House of Burgesses
Martha Wilson   1 Jul 1755 in the 60th year of her  [life]; wife of Col. John Wilson
  Martha Ewin 15 Feb 1741 12 July 1828 wife of James Ewin
  Martha Ewin 14 Mar 1764 21 Jul 1835  
  Joseph Ewin 24 Oct 1775 22 Sep 1835  
  James Ewing 4 Mar 1762 26 Sep 1835  
  John Ewing 13 Dec 1768 3 Jan 1794  
  Sarah Ewing 8 Sep 1766 7 Mar 1793  
  born died notes
Parents of Martha Wilson Ewing
Col. John Wilson 1709 1773 27 Years a Representative in the House of Burgesses
Martha Wilson 1695 10 Jul 1755 in the 60th year of her  [life]; wife of Col. John Wilson
James and Martha Ewing Family
James Ewing   16 Feb 1796 often referred to as Capt. James Ewing
Martha Ewing 15 Feb 1741 12 Jul 1828 wife of James Ewing
  Jane Ewing 4 Mar 1762 26 Sep 1794  
  Martha Ewin 14 Mar 1764 21 Jul 1855  
  Sarah Ewing 8 Sep 1766 7 Mar 1793  
  John Ewing 13 Dec 1768 3 Jun 1794  
  William Ewing 9 May 1771 17 Jun 1794  
  James Ewing Jr. 18 Apr 1775 6 Jun 1779  
  Joseph Ewing 12 Oct 1775 [33] 22 Sep 1835  
  Nancy Ewing 24 Jul 1780 22 Jun 1798  

The Chalkley record, while published earlier, is less complete and does not identify its source. The DAR record is more complete but contains a birth date conflict as well as conflicts with the Chalkley record.

Corrections for Family Dates

There are obvious inaccuracies here, some caused by the difficulty of deciphering inscriptions (as noted in the DAR booklet). Another source of inaccuracies would be that many of the Ewing gravestones and inscriptions were not installed until after 1855. Martha's will, probated in 1855, provided that "I direct that there shall be a decent head and foot stone placed at the grave of each of the family with a suitable inscription on each." That provision of Martha's will, executed more than seventy-six years after the first Ewing graves, may account for errors in the inscriptions such as the birth dates of the siblings James and Joseph being six months apart.

Additionally, there was another son, also named James Jr., who lived locally and died about 1799.[34] He was unmarried5 and most certainly should have been buried here with all of his family. This James Jr.  would have had to be born by 1777 to have been of age eighteen and named an executor of his father James' estate in 1795.[35] It seems most probable that the James Jr. gravestone which the DAR report records actually refers to this James Jr. and the record of his date of death should be 1799 rather the inscribed 1779.[36]

That leaves the problem of there being only six months between the births of siblings James Jr. and Joseph. One of the birth dates must be wrong, but there is no evidence as to which, so that conflict remains unresolved. The Chalkley record definitely has Jane's dates incorrectly attributed to James.[7] The foregoing rationale thus accepts the DAR record with the changed 1799 death date for James Jr.  and recognizes the conflict between the birth dates for James Jr.  and Joseph.

James Ewing's Will [37]

  3 February 1795, Augusta County, Virginia, WB 8, page 244  
  To my beloved wife, Martha, 1/3 of all land as long as she lives and other household furnishings and slaves. To my son James Ewing all lands that William Scott conveyed to me on the East Side of the land I now live on between lands of Philip Singer and James Hathorn and 200 acres joining on the S. W. of James Hathorn and Matthew Wilsons land in Beverly Manor (land to be located with warrant of 500 acres) and 1/2 of the still and 1/5 of the horses. To my son Joseph Ewing the Plantation I purchased of William Dean and now lives upon with 1/2 of the still and other plenishings etc. 1/5 of horses. To daughter, Martha, one negro named Benjamin, 1/5 of horses and 1/3 of cattle and 1/3 household plenishings, etc. To my daughter Nancy, one negro named Frank, 1/5 of the horses and 1/3 of cattle and 1/3 household plenishings. I have a bond on Frances McCormick for £125 and land I purchased of John Williams on Gauley River to be sold and the money collected with that of McCormicks bond to pay last debts and remainder to be divided between wife, Martha and two daughters.
                                                                                                                                                      /s/ James Ewing  [Seal]
 
  Witnesses were: Robert Hanna, John McCutchen and William Wilson. Executors were to be wife, Martha Ewing, John Wilson and Matthew Wilson Jr. Matthew asked to be excused and James Ewing Jr. was made one of the Executors in his place. Mathew Wilson Jr. called James Ewing "Captain Ewing."  
  The will was probated on October 18th 1796.  
  See Land Entry Book - Greenbrier, Kentucky, p. 68 – Capt. Jas. Ewing warrant #2228, 1000 acres on branch Gauley.  

James Ewing's Executors Statement     

The executor's statement [38] by Mathew Wilson which was recorded after the will refers to the preceding will of Capt. James Ewing.

Four children were alive at the time of Capt. James' death. Nancy and James Jr. died a few years later, leaving Joseph and Martha. Joseph lived with his mother and died in 1835. Martha died in 1855.

James Ewing of North Mountain Meeting House Cemetery

Capt. James and his family lived near Middlebrook, Virginia, and were all buried at the Glebe Burying Grounds, nearby the home of Susanna (Ewing) Sproul, daughter of James Ewing of Monroe County. Recently found at the nearby North Mountain Meeting House Cemetery is the grave of Susanna's brother James, another James who died ten years after Captain James. This James also had a son James Jr., so there were some four persons named James Ewing in that area of Augusta County at one time. This explains some of the conflicts and ambiguities such as where apparently duplicate records were actually referencing different persons. Having established that Capt. James and his son James Jr.  died before 1800, subsequent references in the Augusta/Middlebrook area are generally to the North Mountain James family descendents of the Monroe County James. A timeline chart depicting the time-frame on these two James Ewing families appears on the next page.

Reference Notes – Capt. James Ewing

While there are numerous persons named James Ewing in the Augusta County area, the many documented citations noted below are believed to be associated with the Capt. James Ewing family.

Chalkley's Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish Settlement in Virginia has some ninety-seven citations regarding Ewings which relate to at least six different Ewing families.[39] About thirty-seven of these that seem to be associated with Capt. James Ewing of Staunton.

 

Timelines for Capt. James Ewing and North Mountain James Ewing Families

 

 

Ckly Ref

Year

Records Presumed to be Associated with Capt. James Ewing of Staunton

Ch2-276

1761

1 November 1761. James Ewing marriage license

Ch1-98

1762

24 May 1762. (253) James Ewing qualified Captain of Militia.

Ch3-99

1767

WB 3, p. 33 – 13 August 1767, Charles Lockhart's estate appraisement, by James Ewing, et al.; To James Ward Sr.

Ch3-101

1767

WB 4, p. 55 – 13 November 1767. Martha Patterson's estate appraised by James Ewing, John McPheeters, James McCleerey and John McCleere.

Ch3-101

1768

WB 4, p. 161 – 9 September 1768. Robert Wilson's will: farmer; to son, David, 260 acres I live on; wife; son, William (unmarried, infant)  [?]; daughter, Lettice, unmarried; daughter, Ann, unmarried; son, Robert, 105 infant  [?]; sons, Thomas, Samuel, James, have already had their shares. Executrix, wife Mary. Teste: Robert Mitchell, John Tate Sr., John Tate Jr. Proven, November 16th 1768, by John Tate and John Tate Jr. Mary Wilson qualified, with James Ewing, William Crow and Arthur Graham.

Ch1-355

1769

March 1769 (A). James Ewing vs. John Thompson. – Attachment: John Thompson, heir to Anthony and Robert Thompson, late of Pennsylvania. Capt. John Willson, surety. Account as follows: John Thompson, Dr. To your promise to pay me for your brother Robert.

Ch3-500

1770

DB 16, p.391 – 23 April 1770. William McNabb and Martha to son, James McNabb, 10, 150 acres on North Fork of Christian's Creek in Beverley Manor; corner Alexander McFeeters; corner Samuel McNab's part of the tract. Teste: Jas. Ewing, Alexander McFeeters, Samuel McNabb, John Campbell. Delivered: James McNab, June, 1780.

Ch3-115

1770

WB 4, p. 331 – 3 August 1770. John Brown's estate, appraised by James Ewing, William McPheeters, John Buchanan.

Ch1-367

1771

May 1771. William Davis vs. Joseph Scott. – Writ, November 23rd 1771. "Scott is now in Carolina, but expected in. Captain Ewing is his uncle, where he resides when in Virginia."

 

1772

Augusta County, Virginia, DB 18, p. 101 – 13 February 1772

William Dean to James Ewing for 5 shillings paid by ... Ewing sold a tract of land containing 252 acres in Beverly Manor in Augusta Co., beginning at Hugh Davis line to James Trotters line to John McCutchions line on Nathan Lusk's line back to Hugh Davis. Land part of 802 acres to Mary Dean late Mary Cook and to Jean and John Cook all descended to Mary Dean the only surviving heir." Signed only by William Dean. On p. 103, dated 13 April 1775, Mary Dean releases her dower right. This is the land willed to son, Joseph, by the 1795 will of James Ewing. It had been recorded on March 17th 1772. /w/ Wm. Bowyer, Robt. Reed, Jno. Cawley, Dnl. Kidd.[40]

Ch3-517

1772

DB 18, p. 101 – February 1772. William Dean and Mary (?) to James Ewing, 252 acres part of 802 acres conveyed to said Mary Dean, late Mary Cook and to Jean and John Cook by Wm. Beverley, all which land descended to the said Mary Dean, she being the only surviving heir.

Ch1-367

1773

March 1773 (C). James Gamble vs. James Ewing Sr. – Petition. Writ, May 28th 1772. Defendant is son-in-law to Colonel Wilson.

Ch3-210

1773

WB VIII, p. 236 – Mathew Willson, administrator to the legatees of Col. John Wilson,[41] deceased, estate Dr. – A statement of the whole, 1773, paid 18th April, to Patrick Crawford, legatee; 1772, paid, 14th December, to James Ewing, legatee; 1774, paid, 20th April, to Wm McKennan, legatee.

 

1774

Virginia Land Office – Patents No 42 – Reel 41, p.518

Grant without fee to officers and private soldiers as had served in North America and are residing there, lands subject to ten years Quitrents and proven. That Alexander McClanahan, late a Lieutenant in the service of this colony is entitled to two thousand acres, one thousand acres thereof said Alexander hath assigned to James Ewing and lying in the County of Botetourt on the branches of Wolf Creek, a branch of the Green Brier River, including the place in dispute between Ewing and Mann.[42]

Ch3-150

1774

WB 5, p. 1 – 19 November 1774. David Cunningham's will: to wife, Ann, executrix; to son, David, executor; to son, Patrick, 1 shilling; to son, William, 1 shilling; to daughter, Ann, 1 shilling; to daughter, Mary, 1 shilling; to John, David, James, Alexander, Jane, Sarah, all estate. Teste: James Ewing, Capt. James Ewing. Proven, March 17th 1778, by the witnesses. Executor qualified.

Ch3-150

1774

WB 5, p. 4 – 20 August 1774. James Clark's will: to daughter, Jean Clark (Clok), 2 shillings; to daughter, Elizabeth Regh, 2 shillings; to daughter, Sarah Clok, 2 shillings; to son, John, 2 shillings; to son, James, 2 shillings; to son, William's heir, 2 shillings; to daughter, Ane Dunlap, 2 shillings; to son, Alexander, 2 shillings; to son, Samuel, 2 shillings; to son, Robert, 2 shillings; to daughter, Marget, 2 shillings; to wife, Elizabeth. Executors, wife and son Wm. Regh. Teste: James and John McCleerey, James Ewing. Proven, March 17th 1778, by James McCreerey and Ewing.

Ch3-146

1775

WB 5, p. 481 – 4 June 1775. Robert Campbell's will: farmer, to wife, Sarah, executrix, 390 acres home plantation; Hugh Fulton, son-in-law, executor; to daughter, Mary Richey, daughter Martha Kennedy; to daughter, Sarah Fulton; to Rebecca Crawford, daughter of James Crawford and Isabella Crawford, daughter of testator; to Isabella Crawford, daughter to George and Isabella above; to James Crawford's second wife, 5 shillings to be paid each by Isabella and Rebecca when they come of age; to daughter Mary Richey, Wm. Kennady, and Hugh Fulton. Date at end is 4 July 1775. Teste: Pat. Buchanan, James Ewing, James Burnsides, Mathew Wilson. Proven, March 18th 1777, by Buchanan and Wilson. Executors qualified.

Ch3-150

1778

WB 5, p. 16 – 21 April 1778. Recorded: David Cunningham's appraisement by James Ewing, Samuel McCutchan, Wm. Hughes.

Ch3-158

1780

WB 5, p. 154 – 23 September 1780. Jacob Seccafoose's estate appraised by Mathew Willson, James Ewing, Samuel McCutchen.

 

1781

Augusta County Lists I,[43] Feb-June 1781 (including adjacent names in list) James Ewing 2 beeves £1180.

 

1782, 1788

Only Ewing land seems to be for Capt. James and James Jr.  (Listed in both books.[44])

 

1783

Public Claim: James Ewing [45]

 

1783

James Ewing, Assigner, 260 acres assigned to Robert Mitchell.[46],[47]

 

1783

Capt. James Ewing enters by virtue of a preemption warrant for 1,000 No. 2228 on Williams River, a branch of Gauley River, to join his settlement and to extend both up and down the River.[48]

 

1784

Ewing, James 1784 Augusta County Provisions Procured – 2 beeves 1180#  [49]

Ch1-381

1784

October 1784. Philip Benezet vs. James Ewing. – Bond dated February 10th 1761. James Ewing of Stanton Town, in Augusta County, in the Province of Virginia, Chapman.

Ch3-574

1785

DB 24, p. 113 – 31 March 1785. Patrick Cunningham and Jane, of Wilks County, Georgia, to John and David Cunningham, power of attorney to convey tract which belonged to Alexander Cunningham in his lifetime to James Ewing. Teste: Alexander McNutt, Wm. Hamilton, Med. Wood. Acknowledged before Wilks County Court, March 21st 1785. Signed George Dalton, Chief Justice of Georgia. Attest: Benj. Catching. C.W.C.

Ch2-391

1786

20 June 1786. Elizabeth Brown, administrator of Thomas Brown; Jas. Hogshead, Jno. Ewin Jr., administrators of Robt. Hogshead; Alexander Scott, administrator of Thomas Scott; William Bowyer, administrator of Terissa Bowyer.

Ch3-579

1786

DB 25, p. 414 – 20 September, 1786. William Scott, of Lincoln County, to James Ewing. Delivered to Joseph Ewing, son of the grantee, January 4th 1800.

Ch3-590

1786

DB 26, p. 454 – 12 June 1786. Dr. John Jackson, of Washington County, Maryland, to Capt. John and David Cunningham, power of attorney to settle all claims and demands in Augusta County. Teste: James Ewing, Lettice Cunningham.

Ch2-19

1786

Elizabeth Graham vs. James Ewing and John Scott – Debt. Augusta, October 21st 1790. Bond dated October 7th 1786.

 

1786

Greenbrier County Deed Books, 1/16/1786 – James Ewing of Augusta County to Byrnside 1,000 acres on Wolf Creek.

Ch1-246

1786

20 June 1786. (73) – Admn. of estate of Robert Hogshead granted to James Hogshead and John Ewing. Ann, the widow, appeared and refused to administer.

 

1786

James Ewing of Augusta Co. land for ₤50 from James Byrnside of Greenbrier Co. land granted to Alexander McClenahan in 1763 and is land in dispute between Ewing and Mann and is on Wolf Creek branch of Greenbrier River, beginning at the foot of Swoops Knob.[50]

Ch2-347

1787

Married by Rev. Archibald Scott: May 22nd, John Ewing and Sarah Davies.

 

1787

John Ewing married to Sarah Davis by Rev Archibald Scott.[51]

Ch1-249

1787

17 May 1787 (283) – John McCutchen recommended Captain, vice David Trotter, who is removed, and John Ewing, Ensign.

 

1787

Capt. James Ewen and James Ewen (Jr.?) were in census ten days earlier on Tax List A.[52]

 

1793

James Ewing: land dispute on branches of Wolf Creek/Greenbrier River.[53]

 

1794

James Byrnside of Montgomery County, 1,000 acres to James Byrnside Jr. of Greenbrier County. Land formerly owned by Alexander McClenahan. Assigned to James Ewing on Wolf Creek in dispute between Ewing and Mann.[54]

Ch2-318

1795

24 June 1795. Ezekiel Hopping and John Diddey, surety. Ezekiel Hopping and Fanny Cunningham, daughter of John Cunningham (consent). Teste: David Cunningham Jr., James Ewing.

Ch1-280

1795

16 June 1795. (315) John Shark recommended Ensign in 2nd Battalion, vice John Ewing, dead.

Ch3-210

1795

Augusta County WB 8, p. 244 – 3 February 1795. James Ewing's will: to wife, Martha, and children; after the two boys have received their part; to son, James, lands conveyed by William Scott adjoining Philip Osinger and James Hathorn, also 200 acres joining James Hathorn and Mathew Wilson in Beverley Manor; to son, Joseph, tract purchased of William Deen; to daughter, Martha; to daughter, Nancy Ewing. Executors, wife Martha, John Wilson, Mathew Willson, Jr. Teste: Robert Hanna, John McCutchen, Wm. Willson. Proven, October 18th 1796, by the witnesses. Mathew Willson refuses in writing, others personally refused. Administration granted Martha Ewing, John Wellson and James Ewing.

 

1796

Augusta County WB 8, p. 260 – 18 October 1796 – App: personal estate of James Ewing dec'd - $1,844. Appr: John Cunimgham, Dev Cunimgham, William McCutchen

 

1796, 1797

Augusta County WB 8 – Ewing, James 1796 - Will, p. 244; Ewing, James 1797 - Appraisal, p. 260.

Ch3-211

1796

DB 1, p. 260 – James Ewing's appraisement taken November 17th 1796, by John Cunningham, David Cunningham, Wm. McCutchan.

Ch2-27

1800

April 1800. James Burnsides vs. John Wilson, Martha Ewing, James Ewing – James Burnsides, of Montgomery County.

 

1800

Augusta County DB 1A, p. 297 – 2 April 1800 - James Ewing died Intestate and Joseph, his brother, conveys his Middlebrook Lot #9 to Jacob King for ₤15.

 

1800

Augusta County DB 1A, p. 299 – 2 April 1800 - Whereas James Ewing Decd, late of Augusta County possessed a lot in Town of Middle Brook; No 9 in the plot … and whereas James Ewing died Intestate and Joseph Ewing, his brother, became the Regular Heir at Law to the Goods and Charttels of James Ewing, Joseph Ewing sells this lot to Jacob King for £15.

 

1807

m. 1807, Sarah Ewing to John Towell, Rev John Brown.[55]

 

1812

Ewing, Joseph, Private, Glebe Burying Ground, Rte 876/Augusta.[56]

 

1828

Augusta County DB 50, p. 513 – Joseph Ewing of Augusta County to John Randolph for $650  [Difficult to read.]

 

1828

Augusta County DB 50, p. 513 – Assessment: Joseph Ewing and John Randolph.

 

1835

Augusta County WB 21, p. 6 – 1835 bond of John Sproul and Washington Swoope as administrators for estate of Joseph Ewing.

 

1837

Augusta County WB 21, p. 378 – Appraisal of the joint estate of Joseph Ewing dec'd and Marlyn Ewing, including slaves, by Wm Wilson, Wm Beard, Washington Swoope, John Shers.

 

1855

Augusta County DB 76, p. 351 – 10 September 1855 – Martha Ewing Estate to Randolph Turk and A. B. Light – 186 acres 1 mile north of Middlebrook.

 

1855

Augusta County DB 76, p. 387 – 10 December 1855 - Martha Ewen estate to William S. Sproul and Archibald A. Sproul, 94 acres about 1 mile southwest of Middlebrook  [possibly located at Locust Grove] beginning on west side of Middlebrook and Brownsburg Tpk.

 

1855

Augusta County WB 34, p. 518 – Martha Ewin Will – written 1849 and proven 27 August 1855.  [See synopsis in the next subsection.]

 

1855

Augusta County WB 34, p. 634 – Real and Personal Estate of Martha Ewin.

 

1855

Augusta County WB 35, p. 104 – Sale of Personal Estate of Martha Ewin.

 

1855

Augusta County WB 34, p. 518 – Martha Ewing Will.  [See synopsis in the next subsection.]

         

Will of Martha Ewing, signed November 23, 1849, proven 27 August 1855 [57]

Martha Ewing died in 1855 at the age of ninety-one, the last survivor of the family of Capt. James and Martha. Her will shows she was fairly wealthy, but reveals few Ewing family relationships. Her strongest connections seem to be with the Middlebrook Sproul family, who are the children and grandchildren of Susanna Ewing of the Monroe James Ewing family. While no actual family relationship has ever been found between the Staunton and Monroe Ewing families, Martha lived in close proximity to the Sproul family and Martha's family relatives appear to have all died twenty years before her death. The thirty-six items of her will are listed below, grouped by the family relationships that have been identified.[58] 

Martha Ewing/Ewin – 1855 Will
Identifying some beneficiaries

Relationship

Will Item

Ewin and Willson Families

Martha's father was Capt. James Ewing. Martha's mother's parents were Col. John and Martha Wilson of Staunton.

 

Heirs of Rob Ewin, Two Hundred Dollars

 

19

Matthew Willson, One Thousand Dollars

 

6

Two bonds of One Hundred Dollars each, one on John P. Willson dated Feb 19th 1844 and one on Jas S Willson

 

10

James S Willson, One Hundred Dollars

 

12

John P. Willson, One Hundred Dollars

 

13

Thomas Willson, One Hundred Dollars

 

14

Widow of Dr. Wm Willson of the State of Ohio, One Hundred Dollars

 

15

Martha Willson, Twenty Dollars which I direct shall be retained by my executor for her benefit

 

24

Sproul Family

 

 

Heirs of John Sproul dec'd, Two Thousand Dollars

Son of Settler William Sproul

4

William Beard, Fifteen Hundred Dollars

Son of Sidney Sproul (daughter of Settler William) and Joseph Beard and married to a Jane Ewing

5

William Beard, Four Hundred Dollars in addition to the bequest of Fifteen Hundred Dollars before made making in all the sum of Two Thousand Dollars

Son of Sidney Sproul (daughter of Settler William) and Joseph Beard and married to a Jane Ewing

25

the residue of my estate, share and share alike to Matilda K Sproul and her children and to Wm Beard and his heirs forever.

Wife of John Sproul, above

36

Martha Hutchenson, widow of Robert Hutchenson dec'd, One Hundred Dollars

Daughter of Settler William Sproul

8

Fanny Thompson wife of Thomas Thompson, One Hundred Dollars

Daughter of Settler William Sproul

9

Martha A. Sproul, One Hundred Dollars

Daughter of John Sproul, above

26

William White, One Hundred Dollars.

Husband of Fanny, daughter of Settler William Sproul

31

Mary Sheltman, One Hundred Dollars

Daughter of Martha (Sproul) Hutchenson, daughter of Settler William Sproul

32

Martha Moffet, Fifty Dollars

Daughter of Martha (Sproul) Hutchenson, daughter of Settler William Sproul

33

Polly Bell, Fifty Dollars

Daughter of Emeline Sproul, daughter of John Sproul, above. Mary Bell living with Martha in 1850.

23

Mary Jane McCutchon, Ten Dollars to be applied to her schooling

Perhaps daughter of Margaret, daughter of Settler William Sproul

35

William Franklin Steele, Twenty Dollars

Perhaps brother of Lizza Steele Hutchenson

18

Other Persons

 

 

Rev. James McKennon, Four Hundred Dollars

 

7

Rev. James McKennon, Two Hundred Dollars

 

11

Wm Cale, Twenty Dollars to be applied to the schooling of his daughter called for me

 

16

John Cale, Twenty Dollars

son of Peter

30

Jane Argenbright, wife of Augustine, Twenty Dollars

 

21

John Argenbright, Thirty Dollars in trust ... for the benefit of his mother to be paid as her necessities may require

 

29

Henry Mish, Twenty Dollars to be applied to the schooling of his daughter called for me

Martha lived near the Mish place

17

Nancy Dunlap, Twenty Dollars

 

20

George Crawford, One Hundred Dollars

 

27

John Crawford, One Hundred Dollars

father of George

28

Elizabeth Harris, Thirty Dollars

 

34

Other Items

 

 

a decent head and foot stone placed at the grave of each of the family with a suitable inscription on each

 

2

Fifty Dollars as a permanent fund the interest of which is to be applied to keeping in repair of the grave yard at the Glebe

 

22

It is my will and desire all my estate real and personal of every description, shall be sold by my executor as soon after my decease

 

3

all my just debts funeral charges etc, to be paid

 

1

Executor/Bondsmen

 

 

Executor -                Washington Swoope

 

 

Bondsmen -            James Bumgardner

 

                                 William S. Sproul

                                 Samuel Bell

Father of Eugene E., wife of A. A. Sproul, son of John Sproul, above

Son of John Sproul, above

Husband of Emeline Sproul, daughter of John Sproul, above

 

Summary of References [59]

Primary Sources

28          Ewing, James. Will. Augusta County, Virginia, WB 8

35          Ewing, James Sr. Will. Augusta County, Virginia, WB VIII

12, 25         Ewing, Joseph. Will. Bath County, Virginia, WB 1

34          Ewing, Joseph and Jacob King. Land Sale. Augusta County Virginia, DB 1A

29          Ewing, Joseph and Marlyn. Estate Appraisal (1837). Augusta County, Virginia, WB 21

57          Ewing/Ewin, Martha. Will. Augusta County, Virginia, WB 34

38          Wilson, Mathew. Executor Statement. Augusta County, Virginia, WB VIII

Secondary Sources             

15          Botetourt County, Virginia. Book of Surveys, Vol. 1

27          Glebe Burying Grounds, 1749, Stones copied by Major W. A. Murphy and Mrs. W. W. King for the Colonel Thomas Hughart Chapter of the DAR, 1934

13          Greenbrier County, West Virginia, Marriage Records – Greenbrier Historical Society Archives

17          Greenbrier County Surveyor’s Land Book One, from 1750

21          Greenbrier Historical Society J., Vol. 1, No. 1 (August 1963)

49          Abercrombie, James. Virginia Revolutionary Publick Claims

43          Abercrombie, Janice L. and Richard Slatten. Virginia Publick Claims - Augusta County

55          Bushman, Katherine. Second Marriage Record of Augusta County, Va. 1813-1850, DAR, Colonel Thomas Hughart Chapter, 1972

1            Chalkley, Lyman. Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish Settlement in Virginia. Extracted from the Original Records of Augusta County 1745-1800. Three volumes. Genealogy Publishing Co (Baltimore), 1989. Originally published in 1912.          

51          DAR, Col. Thomas Hughart Chapter. First Marriage Record of Augusta County, Va., 1785-1813.

6          Fife, Margaret Ewing (ed. James R. McMichael). Ewing in Early America, Family History Publishers (Bountiful, Utah), 2003, Chapter XI, John Ewing of Carnashannagh

56          Lyman, Mike. Index of the Location of War of 1812 Veteran Graves in Virginia. Compiled by the War of 1812 Society in Virginia, 2007

52          Schreiner-Yantis, Netti. The 1787 Census of Virginia, Augusta County

19          Shuck, Larry. Greenbrier County, West Virginia Records, Vol. 1 – Greenbrier Co. (West) Virginia early survey records, 1780-1799, Greenbrier Co. (West) Virginia early court minutes, 1780-1801, 1811, 1817-1819, Greenbrier Co. (West) Virginia court record books, 1828-1835, district court records, Botetourt, Greenbrier, Kanawha, and Montgomery counties, 1792-1797, district court deeds, Sweet Springs Virginia court house, 1789-1808, Iberian Pub. Co. (Athens, Georgia), 1988

20          Shuck, Larry. Greenbrier County, West Virginia Records, Vol. 2 – Greenbrier County (West) Virginia personal property tax lists: 1782/3, 1786/8, 1792, 1796, 1799, 1805 & 1815, Iberian Pub. Co. (Athens, Georgia), 1988

46          Shuck, Larry. Greenbrier County, West Virginia Records, Vol. 5, Deeds, 1770-1833, Iberian Pub. Co. (Athens, Georgia), 1988

23          Sims, Edgar. Index to Land Grants in West Virginia, Greenbrier County, West Virginia

44          Sparacio, Ruth. Augusta County, Virginia land tax books, 1782-1788 , 1788-1790. Compiled and edited by Ruth and Sam Sparacio, 1987 and 1997

22          Stinson, Helen. Land Entry Book 1780-1786 – Greenbrier County, West Virginia

16          Stinson, Helen. Tithables in Greenbrier Co 1775 in Botetourt Co Va Records

Family-line Genealogical Documentation      

4            Ewing, Evelyn (Jones). Ewings of the Shenandoah Valley, Virginia (Part 1), J. Clan Ewing, Vol. 13, No. 3 (August 2007)

5            Ewing, Evelyn (Jones). Ewings of the Shenandoah Valley, Virginia (Part 2), J. Clan Ewing, Vol. 13, No. 4 (November 2007)

7            Ewing, Nancy Hanks (ed. Barbara Ewing Powell). James Ewing – Pioneer, Self Published, 1994

8            Ewing, Wallace K. The Ewings: One American Family. Self-published, Grand Haven, Michigan, 1998

Acknowledgements

Special thanks to Margarett McCorkle and Wallace K. Ewing for their encouragement and support over the last several years as I have discovered my great-great-great-great-grandfather, the Monroe County settler James Ewing.


 [1] Chalkley, Lyman. Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish Settlement in Virginia. Extracted from the Original Records of Augusta County 1745-1800. Three volumes. Genealogy Publishing Co (Baltimore), 1989. Originally published in 1912. Available online at www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~chalkley.  An list of Ewing citations appears in Appendix A. [Short Citation: Chalkley, Lyman].

 [2] Sproul, William W., III. The Early Ewing Families of Augusta County, Virginia: Part I, Ewing Family J., Vol. 15, No. 2 (May 2009), pp. 24-37. Available online at www.EwingFamilyAssociation.org/documents/Sproul/Sproul_091502.pdf.

 [3] www.EwingFamilyAssociation.org/documents/Sproul/DocDirectory_Clan_Sproul.html         

 [4] Ewing, Evelyn (Jones). Ewings of the Shenandoah Valley, Virginia (Part 1), J. Clan Ewing, Vol. 13, No. 3 (August 2007), pp. 21-26. Available online at:

www.EwingFamilyAssociation.org/2008_Gathering/Document_ShenandoahValleyEwings_Part_1_Final.html.

 [Short Citation: Ewing, Evelyn (Jones) - Part 1]                                                              

 [5] Ewing, Evelyn (Jones). Ewings of the Shenandoah Valley, Virginia (Part 2), J. Clan Ewing, Vol. 13, No. 4 (November 2007), pp. 13-25. Available online at:

www.EwingFamilyAssociation.org/2008_Gathering/Document_ShenandoahValleyEwings_Part_2_Final.html.

 [Short Citation: Ewing, Evelyn (Jones) - Part 2]

 [6] Fife, Margaret Ewing (ed. James R. McMichael). Ewing in Early America, Family History Publishers (Bountiful, Utah), 2003, Chapter XI, John Ewing of Carnashannagh. Available from www.HigginsonBooks.com and online at www.EwingFamilyAssociation.org.  [Short Citation: Fife]

 [7] Ewing, Nancy Hanks (ed. Barbara Ewing Powell). James Ewing – Pioneer, Self Published, 1994. Available online at www.EwingFamilyAssociation.org/books/Document_JamesEwingOfPocahontas.html.  [Short Citation: Ewing, Nancy Hanks]

 [8] Ewing, Wallace K.  The Ewings: One American Family. Self-published, Grand Haven, Michigan, 1998.

 [9] From FamilyTreeMaker.genealogy.com/users/e/w/i/Wallace-Ewing

 [10] Ewing, Evelyn (Jones) - Part 1 and Ewing, Evelyn (Jones) - Part 2

 [11] Fife, Chapter XI - John Ewing of Carnashannagh.

 [12] Bath County, Virginia, WB 1, p.471 – Joshua Ewing's will lists his wife and the eleven children cited here.

 [13] Greenbrier County, West Virginia, Marriage Records – Greenbrier Historical Society Archives. For further information about these archives see www.GreenBrierHistorical.org.

 [14] Although the cemetery was overgrown in 2007 to the point that I could not locate the Ewing stones, the Rhea stones were visible.

 [15] Botetourt County, Virginia. Book of Surveys, Vol. 1, p. 11.

 [16] Stinson, Helen. Tithables in Greenbrier Co 1775 in Botetourt Co Va Records.

 [17] Greenbrier County Surveyor’s Land Book One, from 1750, p. 4.

 [18] The only known 'Samuel Ewing' in this area at this time was the son of James Ewing of Monroe County.

 [19] Shuck, Larry. Greenbrier County, West Virginia Records, Vol 1 – Greenbrier Co. (West) Virginia early survey records, 1780-1799, Greenbrier Co. (West) Virginia early court minutes, 1780-1801, 1811, 1817-1819, Greenbrier Co. (West) Virginia court record books, 1828-1835, district court records, Batetourt, Greenbrier, Kanawha, and Montgomery counties, 1792-1797, district court deeds, Sweet Springs Virginia court house, 1789-1808, Iberian Pub. Co. (Athens, Georgia), 1988, p.2. Further information about this manuscript may be found at:

OpenLibrary.org/b/OL2128121M/Greenbrier_County_(West)_Virginia_records.

 [20] Shuck, Larry. Greenbrier County, West Virginia Records, Vol II – Greenbrier County (West) Virginia personal property tax lists: 1782/3, 1786/8, 1792, 1796, 1799, 1805 & 1815, Iberian Pub. Co. (Athens, Georgia), 1988. Further information about this manuscript may be found at:

OpenLibrary.org/b/OL2128121M/Greenbrier_County_(West)_Virginia_records.

 [21] Greenbrier Historical Society J., Vol. 1, No. 1 (August 1963), p. 17. For information about the society, see www.GreenbrierHistorical.org.

 [22] Stinson, Helen. Land Entry Book 1780-1786 – Greenbrier County, West Virginia, p. 93.  [Short Citation: Stinson, Land Entry]

 [23] Sims, Edgar. Index to Land Grants in West Virginia, Greenbrier County, West Virginia. For further information see www.genealogical.com/products/Sims Index to Land Grants in West Virginia/5401.html.

 [24] This cemetery, near the mouth of Locust Creek, was heavily overgrown but fenced when visited in 2007.

 [25] Bath County, Virginia, WB 1, p.471. Probated April 1811.

 [26] Ibid.

 [27] Glebe Burying Grounds, 1749, Stones copied by Major W. A. Murphy and Mrs. W. W. King for the Colonel Thomas Hughart Chapter of the DAR, 1934. Available online at www.SproulFamily.net/ref/glebe_burying_ground.pdf.  [Short Citation: Glebe Burying Ground]

 [28] Augusta County, Virginia, WB 8, p. 244 – James Ewing Will, February 1795.

 [29] Augusta County, Virginia, WB 21, p. 378 – 1837 Appraisal of estate of Joseph Ewing dec'd and Marlyn

 [30] Ewing, Nancy Hanks

 [31] Chalkley, Lyman

 [32] Glebe Burying Ground

 [33] Note that this record indicates that Joseph was born only six months after James Jr.

 [34] Augusta County DB 1A, p.299 –April 2, 1800. James Ewing possessed a lot in Town of Middle Brook, No. 9 in the plot. James Ewing died Intestate and Joseph Ewing, his brother, became the Regular Heir at Law to the Goods and Chattels of James Ewing. Joseph Ewing sold this lot to Jacob King for £15.

 [35] Augusta County WB VIII, p. 244 –February 3rd 1795.

 [36] I personally visited the Glebe Burying Grounds in 2008 and verified that 1779 was the date on the James Jr. stone and also that the DAR record of Jane was correct.

 [37] Fife, Chapter XXVIII Supplement.

 [38] Augusta Co Will Book VIII, p.244 –February 3, 1795

 [39] Chalkley, Lyman

 [40] Fife, Chapter XXVIII Supplement.

 [41] John Wilson was the father-in-law of Capt. James Ewing.

 [42] This 1,000-acre land grant along Wolf Creek at the foot of Swoopes Knob in 1774 was assigned to Capt. James Ewing of Staunton County, not to James Ewing of Monroe County. When James of Augusta County sold that parcel to James Byrnside in 1786 (Greenbrier County DB 1, p. 16), he also executed a note stating "whereas the said 1000 acres of land is liable to the Dower of Martha the wife of the said Ewing, in case she survive him, the said Martha would relinquish and give all rights and Title to the same  [Byrnside]."

 [43] Abercrombie, Janice L. and Richard Slatten. Virginia Publick Claims - Augusta County, p. 12. Information about this manuscript may be found at OpenLibrary.org/b/OL1350667M/Virginia_publick_claims_name_of_county.  [Short Citation: Abercrombie and Slatten]

 [44] Sparacio, Ruth. Augusta County, Virginia land tax books, 1782-1788, 1788-1790. Compiled and edited by Ruth and Sam Sparacio, 1987 and 1997. Available at the Portsmouth Public Library, Portsmouth, Ohio.  (www.Portsmouth.lib.oh.us)

 [45] Abercrombie and Slatten, p. 14, List I, p. 9.

 [46] Shuck, Larry. Greenbrier County, West Virginia Records, Vol. 5, Deeds, 1770-1833, Iberian Pub. Co. (Athens, Georgia), 1988, p. 8. Further information about this manuscript may be found at: OpenLibrary.org/b/OL2128121M/Greenbrier_County_(West)_Virginia_records.

 [Short Citation: Shuck, 1770 Deeds]

 [47] See citation of note in footnote 41.

 [48] Stinson, Land Entry, p. 98.

 [49] Abercrombie, James. Virginia Revolutionary Publick Claims, p. 91.

 [50] Shuck, 1770 Deeds, p. 11.

 [51] DAR, Col. Thomas Hughart Chapter. First Marriage Record of Augusta County, Va., 1785-1813.

 [52] Schreiner-Yantis, Netti. The 1787 Census of Virginia, Augusta County. For further information about this manuscript, see www.LibraryThing.com/work/3711434.

 [53] Shuck, 1770 Deeds, p. 29.         

 [54] Shuck, 1770 Deeds, p. 28.

 [55] Bushman, Katherine. Second Marriage Record of Augusta County, Va. 1813-1850, DAR, Colonel Thomas Hughart Chapter, 1972.

 [56] Lyman, Mike. Index of the Location of War of 1812 Veteran Graves in Virginia. Compiled by the War of 1812 Society in Virginia, 2007.

 [57] Augusta County WB 34, p.518 – August 27, 1855, Martha Ewin will.

 [58] I have reorganized and grouped the items in the will into sections based on the families of the beneficiaries: First, Ewing/Wilson family beneficiaries; second, Sproul family beneficiaries; third, beneficiaries in other families; and finally, items that are not related to any beneficiary family. The purpose of this grouping is to vividly show that Martha’s (and the Capt. James Ewing family’s) fortune predominately went to my Sproul family which strengthens suggestions of a Staunton Capt. James Ewing family relationship with the Monroe James Ewing family whose daughter Susanna was the Sproul family matriarch.

 [59] Specific page references and online access information are not repeated here. Consult the cited footnotes for this information.