The Y-DNA Project of the Ewing Family Association welcomes your questions and comments: dna@ewingfamilyassociation.org.

The following reports have been prepared to provide background information about the settlement of the Shenandoah Valley by Ewings.

Echoes of the Schenandoah: Final Report (PDF)
Mary Ewing Gosline, J. Clan Ewing, Vol. 14, No. 4 (November 2008), pp. 1-4.

This article provides a synopsis of the events at the Tenth Gathering.

Historical Context

Colonial History of the Shenandoah Valley (PDF)
Evelyn Jones Ewing, J. Clan Ewing, Vol. 13, No. 2 (May 2007), pp. 11-14.

An introduction to the settlement of the Shenandoah Valley by William Ewing and other descendants of John Ewing of Carnashannagh.

A Short History of Stephens City (PDF)
Jeannette Ewing, J. Clan Ewing, Vol. 14, No. 2 (May 2008), pp. 16-18.

Many towns were settled around the time that Stephens City received its charter in 1758 under the name of Stephensburg. Also known as Newtown and Pantops, it is located in the Shenandoah Valley just south of Winchester. This article reviews the town's early settlement and growth, with attention to several early residents who helped establish the city's culture and economic infrastructure.

Great Philadelphia Wagon Road (PDF)
Jean McClure, J. Clan Ewing, Vol. 13, No. 3 (August 2007), pp 15-20.

A discussion of the genesis of the migration path from Philadelphia into and through the Shenandoah Valley, with an emphasis on the use of this migration path by descendants of John Ewing of Carnashannagh who settled the Stephens City, Frederick County, Virginia, area.

The Newtown Wagon (PDF)
Linden Fravel, J. Clan Ewing, Vol. 14, No. 1 (February 2008), pp 13-18.

Focuses attention on one of the most common and essential tools of early America, the road wagon. Complementing the information about the Conestoga Wagon in Jean McClure's previous report, Linden describes the Newtown wagon and the wagon industry in Newtown (Stephens City). He also provides information about the history of the Frederick County area up to the Civil War.

Winchester Experiences the Civil War (PDF)
Trish Ridgeway, J. Clan Ewing, Vol. 14, No. 2 (May 2008), pp. 13-15.

During the Civil War, Winchester was decimated. The area saw huge numbers of soldiers occupying its buildings and consuming everything in sight. Not only that, but soldiers brought typhoid and other virulent diseases that spread through the local population. This article briefly discusses the resulting suffering of civilians and soldiers during this period.

A Brief History of Clog Dancing (PDF)
Mary Ewing Gosline (with the help of Stacey Lovett Clark), J. Clan Ewing, Vol. 14, No. 3 (August 2008), p. 12. 

A brief introduction to Clog Dancing, an Appalachian percussive-dance art form. [Links to more in-depth information are provided in the article.]

First Family Reunion in Valley: Family discovers ties to popular 'Dallas' TV show. The Winchester Star, August 16, 2008. (PDF)
Charlotte J. Eller, J. Clan Ewing, Vol. 14, No. 4 (November 2008), pp. 7-9.

This is a newspaper article published in advance of the 2008 Gathering which discussed the dedication for the local Ewing Cemetery and Polly Ewing Brown's presentation on the connection to the J. R. Ewing family in the 'Dallas' TV show.

Ewing Families

Ewings of Shenandoah Valley, Virginia (Part 1) (PDF)
Evelyn Jones Ewing, J. Clan Ewing, Vol. 13, No. 3 (August 2007), pp 15-20.

A genealogy of the descendants of John Ewing of Carnashannagh emphasizing the children of William Ewing, his son.

Ewings of Shenandoah Valley, Virginia (Part 2) (PDF)
Evelyn Jones Ewing, J. Clan Ewing, Vol. 13, No. 4 (November 2007), pp 13-25.

A continuation of the genealogy of the descendants of John Ewing of Carnashannagh emphasizing the children of William Ewing, his son.

John Ewing, Son of William Ewing, Grandson of John Ewing of Carnashannagh (PDF)
Darryl Dene DaHarb, J. Clan Ewing, Vol. 13, No. 4 (November 2007), pp 26-31.

A discussion of the descendants of the William Ewing who is the emphasis of the Ewings of Shenandoah Valley, Virginia reports by Evelyn Jones Ewing.

Local Attractions and Activities

The Handley Library, Winchester, Virginia (PDF)
Jeannette Ewing, J. Clan Ewing, Vol. 13, No. 2 (May 2007), p. 15. 

A brief introduction to an important library to visit and conduct research in while attending the 2008 Gathering.

Historical and Genealogical Research in Frederick County, Virginia (PDF)
Rebecca Ebert, J. Clan Ewing, Vol. 14, No. 3 (August 2008), pp. 10-11.

Tips from Rebecca Ebert, Archivist at the Handley Library's Stewart Bell Jr. Archives, for those planning to do research regarding Winchester and Frederick County.

The Museum of the Shenandoah Valley and the Historic House and Gardens at Glen Burnie (PDF)
Ted and Betty (Ewing) York, J. Clan Ewing, Vol. 14, No. 1 (February 2008), p. 12.

Provides a glimpse of the Historic House and Gardens at Glen Burnie, home of the founder of Winchester, Col. James Wood and the adjacent Museum of the Shenandoah Valley which provides visitors with many insights into the founding and evolution of this region of Virginia.

Cedar Creek Presbyterian Church, Marlboro, Virginia (PDF)
Evelyn Jones Ewing, J. Clan Ewing, Vol. 14, No. 2 (May 2008), pp. 19-21.

The Cedar Creek Presbyterian Church was founded in 1736 on Cedar Creek, an important tributary of the Shenandoah River. Opequon Presbyterian Church, also founded in 1736, is situated on Opequon Creek about three miles southwest of Winchester and four miles north of Stephens City. The congregations of Cedar Creek and Opequon, two of the oldest churches in the Winchester area and only about nine miles apart, have shared pastors and enjoyed a close relationship through the years.

Winchester - Home of Spirits and Ghosts (PDF)
Evelyn Jones Ewing, J. Clan Ewing, Vol. 14, No. 2 (May 2008), p. 12.

Winchester resident Mac Rutherford conducts popular evening Ghost Tours through Winchester and Mt. Hebron Cemetery. During his tours, he weaves fascinating stories about the area's ghosts and spirits. Many of these stories are included in a recent collection of quite amusing one-to-three-page write-ups. Three of the locations he includes on his tours are quite close to each other. Gathering attendees might be interested in visiting them while in Winchester. This article provides synopses of his stories about these three locations.

More Winchester Spirits and Ghosts (PDF)
Evelyn Jones Ewing, J. Clan Ewing, Vol. 14, No. 3 (August 2008), pp. 13-14.

Additional synopses of Mac Rutherford's sketches of spirits and ghosts said to be in the Winchester area.

History of the Wayside Inn (PDF)
J. Clan Ewing, Vol. 14, No. 2 (May 2008), p. 11. 

A short history of the Wayside Inn in Middletown, Virginia, which will be the venue for the Gathering's dinner on Friday, September 19, 2008.

Winchester Area Attractions and Activities (PDF)

Attractions and activities attendees might take advantage of during the open-activity periods on Friday and Saturday afternoons or during extra days before and after the gathering.

Local Area Attractions (PDF)
Karen Avery, J. Clan Ewing, Vol. 14, No. 1 (February 2008), pp. 19-20.

A list of attractions in the general area --- Washington, D.C., to the north, the Allegheny Mountains to the west and Williamsburg on the south --- attendees want to visit and enjoy during extra days before and after the gathering.

The Blue Ridge Parkway and the Skyline Drive in the Mountains of the Shenandoah Valley (PDF)
Mary Ewing Gosline, J. Clan Ewing, Vol. 14, No. 3 (August 2008), pp. 15-16. 

Guidance for those planning to tour the Blue Ridge Parkway and Skyline Drive, both scenic parkways through the Blue Ridge Mountains. [Several links to additional information are provided in the article.]

Winchester in Frederick County ... so close to everywhere! Located at the northern tip of Virginia, it is the northern gateway to the Shenandoah Valley. Just 70 miles northwest of Washington, DC, Winchester, Frederick County, is located along Interstate 81 and is convenient to Interstate 66. Routes 50, 7, and 522 intersect in Winchester.

Winchester, surrounded by vast orchards, constitutes one of the largest apple export markets of the nation and the largest apple producing area in Virginia.

Winchester is known for hosting the Shenandoah Valley Apple Blossom Festival, an annual event featuring the world's largest fire-fighters' parade. Festival highlights also include a grand feature parade, coronation of Queen Shenandoah, a circus, a large arts-and-crafts show in the park, and much, much more! The population of Winchester rises from 25,000 to 250,000 during the Apple Blossom Festival.

Winchester has received awards for Best Public Celebrations and Most Loveable Small Towns in Mountain Homes - Southern Style's Winter 2007 Annual Guide issue. Chosen from towns in upscale communities in Virginia, West Virginia, North and South Carolina, Tennessee and Maryland, Winchester ranks number 14. This comes on the heels of a survey done by a major insurance company that named Winchester one of the safest of its size in the entire U.S.

Winchester, Virginia, was settled primarily by Germans and Scots-Irish.

Newtown, Newtonfield, Stephensburg, Pantops, Stephens, Stephens City--- all names for the town where the road to Alexandria intersected the Great Wagon Road.

The tomb of Lord Fairfax, the home and grave of Revolutionary hero General Daniel Morgan, George Washington's headquarters and those of Stonewall Jackson - all within Winchester.

Frederick County was the birthplace of Pulitzer Prize winning novelist Willa Cather and the hometown of country music legend Patsy Cline.

 

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